Funds in Connecticut Will Assist Sexual Assault Probes

Helping Connecticut process sexual assault evidence kits in a more timely manner is the focus of new federal funding.

The U.S. Department of Justice announced it will award $1.2 million to Connecticut that will be used at the state’s Forensic Laboratory for adding personnel, supplies, and equipment to aid ongoing efforts in sexual assault investigations, Gov. Ned Lamont said.

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NYC Abandons De Blasio-Era Admissions Policies as Families Flee Public Schools

New York City is changing its admission policies implemented by former Democratic Mayor Bill de Blasio, now basing admissions to selective high schools and middle schools on test scores amidst the city’s enrollment drop, according to a press release by New York City Schools Chancellor David C. Banks.

In an effort to admit “top-performing applicants,” the top 15% of students with a grade point average (GPA) of 90 or above, will be vetted first for the selective schools, according to a press release by Banks. The previous admissions policy was a random lottery that allowed underperforming students to receive admission to the screened schools, introduced during the pandemic.

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No Chance of Winning’: Four Female Athletes Challenge Connecticut High School Transgender Policy

Four female athletes are locked in a legal battle over transgender athletes that could set major precedent for the same fight playing out in schools around the country.

The four female athletes appealed to a federal court over a Connecticut policy allowing high school males identifying as females to compete against girls. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit heard Soule v. Connecticut Association of Schools this week, where the girls’ legal team argued the policy is unfair to girls and hands female sports victories over to transgender athletes.

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New England Governors Push for Home Heating Assistance

New England governors are pressing the federal government for a supplement aid package supporting home heating assistance to residents this winter.

Led by Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont, the governors penned a letter to congressional leaders expressing their desire to see approval of President Joe Biden’s request for the emergency supplemental funding package that would assist residents with home heating assistance.

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Connecticut Parent Leader: Superintendent’s Support for Teacher Who Introduced Woke Worksheet ‘Slap in the Face to Parents’

A leader of Southington, Connecticut’s Families for Freedom organization told The Connecticut Star she views the district superintendent’s support for a teacher who introduced a vocabulary worksheet for high school students, instructing them in the tenets of Critical Race Theory (CRT) and gender ideology, a “slap in the face to parents.”

“We are going to be pushing for policy change because it was clear that this teacher taught outside the curriculum,” said Susan Zabohonski during a telephone interview. “Taught a biased paper without following the proper procedure. Yet, the superintendent said he’s still going to back this teacher and all teachers going forward.”

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Yale University Set to Research $1 Million Project to Combat Racist Hair in Video Game

Yale University’s Computer Science Department recently announced a $1 million donation given to them from the Bungie Foundation for a research project that fights against racist hair graphics in video games.

“It is widely assumed that the algorithms used to generate virtual humans are based in biological underpinnings that accurately reflect all races and ethnicities,” the announcement reads. “In reality, however, these algorithms are deeply biased and based on predominantly European features.”

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New York City Education Department Fires 850 More Teachers for Refusing COVID Vaccine

The New York City Department of Education has fired another 850 teachers and aides for refusing to comply with its COVID vaccine mandate, bringing the total number of school staff terminated over the mRNA shots that have not prevented the spread of infection to 2,000.

Some 1,300 department employees agreed to comply with the vaccine mandate by September 5 after taking a year of unpaid leave with benefits, the New York Post reported. The department informed personnel they would have to be vaccinated by that date or be “deemed to have voluntarily resigned.”

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Connecticut Pension Funds to Benefit from $2.8 Billion Transfer

A historical payment is headed to Connecticut’s pension plan.

State Comptroller Natalie Braswell is in the process of transferring $3.1 billion from the state’s operating surplus into the rainy day fund, triggering a one-time, special payment of $2.8 billion into the state’s unfunded pension liabilities, Gov. Ned Lamont said.

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Connecticut Communities to Receive Grant Money for Infrastructure Projects

Improving infrastructure is the focus of new grant awards in Connecticut.

More than $31.3 million will be distributed to 77 towns across the state, Gov. Ned Lamont said, that will be used for a road safety reconstruction project, sewer and drainage upgrades, sidewalk and pedestrian safety enhancements, and various capital improvement projects.

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Connecticut Residents Push Back Against Move to Expand ‘Section 8’ Affordable Housing

As Connecticut has the sixth-highest median monthly housing costs, some residents and lawmakers are fiercely pursuing measures to prevent developers from building affordable housing units in their towns.

Renee Dobos, chief executive officer of Connecticut Housing Partners, told The Center Square that more than 30 years ago the General Assembly recognized steps should be taken to lead towns to recognize they have a responsibility to make housing affordable to essential workers, senior citizens, and a wide variety of others with diverse incomes.

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Connecticut Farmers Seek More Aid

If approved on the federal level, more Connecticut farmers could gain assistance for the harsh realities dealt them by the ongoing drought.

A natural disaster request was submitted to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Gov. Ned Lamont said, for Litchfield and New Haven counties where drought conditions have caused damage to farms.

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Connecticut Renters Struggle to Find Affordable Housing

Renters in Connecticut are short on options with prices soaring.

“Currently, Connecticut has a shortage of 85,000 units of affordable housing for those families that earn an income of 80% or below the AMI,” Renée Dobos, CEO of Connecticut Housing Partners, told The Center Square. AMI is an acronym for area medium income.

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Connecticut High School English Teacher’s Woke Worksheet Draws Outrage

A Southington High School English teacher’s student worksheet that defined terms often associated with the concepts of Critical Race Theory (CRT) and radical gender theory drew anger from parents, students, board of education officials, and members of the community.

School board members said they were unaware of the three-page worksheet packet until they read about it on social media.

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Connecticut AG Threatens Project Veritas with Subpoena over Video Exposé of Public School Hirings

Project Veritas, the investigative journalism group, was put on notice by the state of Connecticut with a records hold request and an indication of potential subpoenas coming their way as part of an investigation into discriminatory hiring practices at Greenwich Public Schools.

Veritas in late August published a secretly recorded interview with Cos Cob Elementary School Assistant Principal Jeremy Boland in which he appeared to admit to discriminatory hiring practices against Catholics and conservatives.

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Connecticut Program Up for National Award

A Connecticut family-based program has been nominated for a national award.

Care 4 Kids Parent Portal has been named for the National Association of State Chief Information Officers as a finalist in the 2022 State IT Recognition Awards, Gov. Ned Lamont said. The program, run through the office of Early Childhood, was created in 2021 to give low- to -moderate-income families a subsidy to pay for child care.

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Connecticut GOP Gubernatorial Candidate Bob Stefanowski Announces ‘Parental Bill of Rights’

Connecticut Republican candidate for governor Bob Stefanowski announced a “Parental Bill of Rights” that seeks to empower the state’s parents to make education and healthcare decisions for their children.

“During the last several years, the pendulum has swung too far against the rights of parents and their ability to make critical decisions for their children in terms of education, healthcare, and the teaching of moral values they hold dear,” Stefanowski said Tuesday. “As Governor, I am going to reverse that trend and restore parental rights in a significant and meaningful way.”

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Lawsuit Alleges Students Were Bullied in Connecticut School District for Their Political Beliefs

by Reagan Reese   Parents of a Connecticut school district are suing over a school policy which has led to their students being bullied because of their political beliefs. The lawsuit filed Wednesday to the U.S. District Court against Board of Education at Guilford Public Schools in Guilford, Connecticut, alleges that a…

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Connecticut Task Force Begins Examining Early Childhood Workforce Concerns

Licensure requirements, professional development opportunities and employment compensation are among some of the weighty issues a new Connecticut task force will delve into in the coming months.

The state’s Early Childhood Workforce Development Task Force held its first monthly meeting recently and began laying the groundwork for its deep-dive conversations in the coming months.

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Yale University Recieves $1 Million to Conduct Study on ‘Racism’ of Video Game Characters’ Hair

The Ivy League university at Yale was recently gifted $1 million by a nonprofit group to carry out a study for the purpose of drawing a connection between racism and the hair colors of video game characters.

As reported by the Daily Caller, the study will be lead by Professor Theodore Kim, and will seek to “develop new tools and algorithms to bring inclusivity to the digital screen,” as stated in a press release by Yale. The statement went on to add, with no evidence, that video game algorithms are “deeply biased” and favor “predominantly European features” whenever creating a player’s in-game avatar.

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New Hampshire Community in Turmoil as Political Activist LGBTQ Organization Scheduled to Conduct Teacher Training

The firestorm in New Hampshire School Administrative Unit (SAU) 21 is continuing over a scheduled teacher training September 13 by political activist LGBTQ organization Seacoast Outright, which also stands with Black Lives Matter.

“In SAU21, the upcoming teacher training on September 13th has caused political factions to argue against each other,” wrote education researcher and parental rights advocate Ann Marie Banfield at Granite Grok Friday.

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Connecticut Republican Gubernatorial Candidate Bob Stefanowski Vows to Target Hundreds of Licensing and Regulatory Fees Small Businesses Forced to Pay

Republican candidate for Connecticut governor Bob Stefanowski pledged last week to cease collection of the hundreds of licensing and regulatory fees small businesses and entrepreneurs are forced to pay prior to their repeal by the next legislature.

“Now I know everybody’s gonna jump up and down, you can’t do that, OK,” Stefanowski said Tuesday, according to CT Mirror. “I’m going to tell [the tax commissioner] to do it.”

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Connecticut’s Broadband Program Gains Federal Approval

A Connecticut plan to use federal funding to expand broadband access in the state has gained federal approval.

The Connecticut Broadband Infrastructure Program, Gov. Ned Lamont said, will use $42.9 million in American Rescue Plan Act funding to expand service to underserved areas in the state and was approved by the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Broadband will be expanded, or improved, in 10,000 households and businesses.

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Report Reveals Force Used in One Percent of Arrest Incidents in Connecticut

A new report shows that Connecticut’s law enforcement agencies use force 1% of the time.

The Institute of Municipal and Regional Policy used police use of force from across the state in its report. Kenneth Barone, associate director of the Institute for Municipal and Regional Policy, told The Center Square that the report was a challenge as it is the first of its kind and only the second state-wide analysis of use of force in the nation.

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Connecticut Elementary Assistant Principal on Leave After Project Veritas Video Revealed He Ensures Rejecting Catholics and Conservatives as Hires

Assistant Principal Jeremy Boland of Cos Cob Elementary School is on leave in the wake of a Project Veritas (PV) undercover video that recorded his claims of how he ensures his school does not hire Catholics or conservatives in order to guarantee “subtle” leftwing indoctrination of children.

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Project Veritas: Connecticut Assistant Principal Shares How He Rejects Hiring ‘Catholics’ and ‘Conservatives’ to Allow ‘Subtle’ Child Indoctrination

Project Veritas released its latest exposé in which an assistant principal in a Cos Cob, Connecticut elementary school shares with an undercover reporter his strategies to ensure he never hires “Catholics” or “conservatives” to guarantee the children in his school are exposed to “subtle” leftwing indoctrination.

This first video of Project Veritas’ (PV) newly launched Education Series reveals how Jeremy Boland, assistant principal at Cos Cob Elementary School, part of Greenwich Public Schools, ensures he maintains a staff of primarily young, leftwing teachers who will introduce the children to “subtle” indoctrination of principles that align with the current Democrat Party.

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Connecticut U.S. Senate Candidate Leora Levy: Biden’s and Blumenthal’s ‘Inflation Reduction Act’ Is ‘Gaslighting Americans’

Joe Biden’s “Inflation Reduction Act,” which seeks to “gaslight Americans into thinking it is something that it is not,” will allow Biden and Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) “to tax middle-class American families, to the tune of $10.6 billion in new taxes,” wrote Connecticut Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate Leora Levy in an op-ed Sunday at the Hartford Courant.

Levy, who emerged the victor in the Connecticut GOP primary race to unseat career Democrat Blumenthal, put Biden’s signature legislation into perspective.

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Viral Video: Yale’s Pediatric Gender Program Treats Toddlers

A viral video of Yale University’s Pediatric Gender Program Director has started a firestorm on social media after the Director revealed that children as young as three years-old are being treated with gender medical intervention.

In the video, Dr. Christy Olezeski, current Director of the program, reveals that the program “works with gender-expansive individuals 3 to 25 and their families,” and aims to “help individuals who are questioning their gender identity or who identify as transgender or non-binary.”

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PACT Program Extended in Connecticut

A program that provides taxpayer funding for qualifying Connecticut students to attend community college has been extended.

PACT provides funding to students to cover the difference between state and federal grants, community college tuition and mandatory fees, and, for the first time, allows part-time students taking six or more credits to qualify for the program.

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Biden Education Department Investigating Allegations of Discrimination Against LGBTQ Students in Connecticut Middle School

The Biden Department of Education is investigating a complaint made by the parent of a Farmington, Connecticut middle school student who claims school administrators failed to protect her “nonbinary” child from bullying.

According to a report Sunday at the Hartford Courant, Melissa Combs, mother of Miles (fictitious name), an eighth grade student at Irving A. Robbins Middle School (IAR), who identifies as ‘nonbinary,’” filed a “19,000-word, 54-page complaint” with the U.S. Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR).

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Connecticut Gaming Revenue Rebounding from COVID-19

Connecticut’s gaming revenue continues to grow and evolve since the heaviest pandemic-induced shutdowns impacted the income source two years ago.

A five-year analysis of the state’s gaming-derived revenues, gleaned from data via the state Department of Consumer Protection, shows how COVID-19 intermittently impacted the bottom line during the heaviest lockdowns before regaining momentum.

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Study: Connecticut’s Disabled Residents Struggle to Make Ends Meet

A recent report reveals that many Connecticut residents living with disabilities are unable to afford basic necessities.

The United Way of Central and Northeastern Connecticut released a study that shows 48% of disabled residents in the state are living in ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) or poverty-level conditions and struggle to afford basic housing, child care, health care, and transportation.

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Connecticut Program Seeks to Land Workers in High-Demand Jobs

Connecticut is implementing a new training program that is designed to give workers the skills necessary to fill jobs in high-priority occupations.

CareerConneCT, a $70 million program, backed by American Rescue Plan Act funds, will operate 19 various job training programs, Gov. Ned Lamont said. The training programs are aimed at giving workers affected by the COVID-19 pandemic short-term training to get them the credentials needed to work in various sectors of the workforce in higher quality jobs that are in demand.

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Connecticut State Police Deal with 150 Drug Equipment Violations in 2020

Connecticut State Police law enforcement officers grappled with 150 drug equipment violations in 2020, according to the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS).

This equals 12 per month in 2020.

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Boston Children’s Hospital Gender Psychologist Asserts Many Children Know They Are Transgender ‘As Early as Seemingly from the Womb’

A psychologist at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Gender Multispecialty Service (GeMS) states in a video titled “Caring for Young Transgender Kids” that many children know they are transgender “as early as seemingly from the womb.”

“A good portion of children do know as early as seemingly from the womb,” says Kerry McGregor, PsyD in a Boston Children’s Hospital video from May 2021. “And they will usually express their gender identity as very young children, some as soon as they can talk. They may say phrases such as ‘I’m a girl,’ or ‘I’m a boy,’ or ‘I’m going to be a woman,’ ‘I’m going to be a mom.’”

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Report: Michigan Among the Worst ‘Free Speech’ States in the Union

Three Midwestern states scored best in the nation in analysis of laws restricting speech about government. Wisconsin, Michigan, and Iowa outranked every other state by wide margins.

That’s the conclusion of a report issued by the Institute for Free Speech, a national nonprofit research facility that focuses on First Amendment rights. Wisconsin’s score of 86% out of a possible 100% was followed by Michigan (77%) and Iowa (75%).

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Connecticut Republican U.S. Senate Candidate Leora Levy: Sen. Richard Blumenthal ‘Laughs Off’ Concern over Biden’s Creation of 87,000 New IRS Agents to Target Americans

Connecticut GOP U.S. Senate candidate Leora Levy observed Senator Richard Blumenthal’s (D-CT) mockery of Americans expressing concern over Joe Biden’s creation of 87,000 new IRS Agents in his legislation that will increase taxes on middle-income Americans and will do nothing to reduce inflation.

“I think the IRS is going to target the highest income Americans,” Blumenthal minimized concern over the Inflation Reduction Act on CNN’s State of the Union recently. “As the saying goes, that’s where the money is. That’s where they’re going to look to collect. The idea that there’s going to be this army of IRS agents defending descending on the average American is just preposterous.”

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Commentary: The Real Job Crisis in Connecticut

The real crisis in the U.S. labor market is not, as we keep hearing, that there are not enough people who can work. The real crisis is all of the working-age people on the sidelines, not even looking for a job. Yes, the unemployment rate is low, but that statistic covers only people who have looked for a job in the last four weeks. The labor force participation rate, which measures the share of working-age people working or at least looking for work, shows a long-term decline, especially for men without a college degree. This is especially true in states like Connecticut. When able-bodied men are not even looking for work, a host of social problems ensue — from crime, to drug addiction, to family breakdown. 

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Levy Tops Connecticut GOP Field, Challenges Blumenthal in November

The picture for Connecticut’s November general election cleared with Tuesday’s primary.

The Election Day turnout of 20.37% cast ballots to determine who qualifies for the November election for one U.S. Senate seat, five U.S. House seats, and the state’s secretary of state and treasurer.

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Hospitality Sector Set to Receive New Round of State Funding

The hospitality industry in Connecticut will be benefiting from new state funding.

Restaurants, hotels, transportation agencies, and other businesses will receive a share of $30 million in grant funding, Gov. Ned Lamont said, under the Connecticut Hospitality Industry Support Program.

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Connecticut Invests in Infrastructure at Rocky Hill Facility

Veterans coming to Connecticut’s Rocky Hill campus will be seeing changes.

Gov. Ned Lamont announced Thursday the state will be performing $5.1 million in infrastructure upgrades to the Department of Veterans Affairs facility in Hartford. The funding was approved at last week’s State Bond Commission meeting.

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Connecticut Will Use Federal Funds to Get People Back to Work

Connecticut is focusing on a workforce investment designed to place state residents from underserved communities into high-demand jobs.

Gov. Ned Lamont announced Thursday the state was awarded $23.9 million through the American Rescue Plan’s Good Jobs Challenge through the U.S. Department of Commerce. The funds will be invested into the Office of Workforce Strategy programs designed to place more than 2,000 residents into the workforce.

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Former President Donald Trump Endorses Leora Levy in Connecticut GOP Primary Race

Former President Donald Trump endorsed Connecticut Republican Leora Levy Thursday in her primary race for the U.S. Senate seat occupied by career Democrat Senator Richard Blumenthal.

“Leora Levy is running to represent the Great State of Connecticut in the United States Senate,” Trump said in the statement regarding his endorsement.

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Connecticut Making Investment in Sewer Pollution Prevention Projects

Preventing sewage pollution is the focus of a new investment in Connecticut.

Democratic Gov. Ned Lamont, who will be challenged by Republican Bob Stefanowski in November’s general election, says the state is pledging $580 million to shovel-ready municipal water pollution control projects around the state. The investment is designed to cut down on sewage pollution in the state’s waters.

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Connecticut General Assembly Conservatives Want to Know Why Democrats Are ‘Erasing’ Records of Violent Criminals

While the Connecticut General Assembly Conservative Caucus agrees, “Violent and threatening people should not possess firearms,” its members want to know why Governor Ned Lamont (D) and Democrat state lawmakers passed a law that is “automatically erasing many of the criminal convictions” that could now allow violent and threatening individuals to buy a gun.

In an op-ed published Friday at CT Examiner, the caucus members observed the hypocrisy of Connecticut Democrats crying out “something must be done” following the horrific shooting massacres that have recently plagued the nation, but then turning around to pass a law that automatically deletes many criminal convictions that would block a person from purchasing a gun.

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Election 2022: Connecticut Primary Elections Set for August 9

Connecticut’s primary election election day is eight days away.

Voters will turn out to the polls on Tuesday, August 9 to set the general election ballot in November for attorney general, and one U.S. Senate seat and five seats in the U.S. House.

The primary for the governor’s race has been canceled since only one candidate from each major party is running. Democratic incumbent Gov. Ned Lamont will face Republican challenger Bob Stefanowski in November’s general election.

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Bond Commission Set to Approve $34 Million Funding for Connecticut’s State Parks

Patrons of the great outdoors in Connecticut could be seeing a myriad of improvements at state parks and other facilities.

The State Bond Commission on Friday is expected to approve $34 million in state funding on that will be used to improve and increase access for residents utilizing the aging state parks system.

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GOP-Endorsed Candidate Themis Klarides Touts Stance as Pro-Abortion Career Politician in Connecticut Race to Beat Sen. Richard Blumenthal

Former Connecticut state Representative Themis Klarides touted her 22 years as a state lawmaker and her support for abortion and gun control as she faced off against two conservative Republican candidates during a GOP primary debate for the U.S. Senate seat currently occupied by career Democrat Senator Richard Blumenthal.

Klarides’ liberal positions on several issues, portrayed as what is acceptable for Connecticut Republicans, clashed with those of Greenwich fundraiser and former trader Leora Levy and immigration attorney Peter Lumaj.

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Republican Governors Association Slams Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont over Public Safety Record

The Republicans Governors Association (RGA) slammed Governor Ned Lamont’s record on public safety, following a deadly week in the state.

Over the past days, multiple incidents left individuals in Connecticut in police custody or in the hospital due to gun violence.

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